Hidden Figures: They Really Did Make America Great, Again

Hidden Figures
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Back in 1985, Aretha Franklin teamed up with British pop duo Eurhythmics to sing “Sisters are doin’ it for themselves”. Well, apparently the sisters have been doing it for themselves long before 1985. As evidenced by the compelling and thought-provoking film Hidden Figures starring Taraji P. Henson (Katherine Johnson), Janelle Monáe (Mary Jackson) and Octavia Spencer (Dorothy Vaughan).

Most moviegoers would probably agree that there has been a dearth of well-written, acted and directed films. However, Hollywood has placed more emphasis on special effects, violence and sex as opposed to a good storyline. Therefore, real film buffs should flock to the theaters to see Hidden Figures. Why? It has storylines and great acting and directing galore.

It’s not just an intelligent film about three incredibly smart and innovative black women. It’s a story about the heart and soul of America. The movie deals with the space race and race relations, education and segregation, men versus women, black versus white. Yet, instead of alienating the audience with such controversial topics, it somehow manages to bring people together.

One thing that the movie reminds the audience about is that, as a nation, we are stronger when we work together. Back in the 60’s, although the civil rights movement was still in full effect, every American was united in the purpose of beating the Russians to the moon.

Hidden Figures brought to light the fact that many black women played an important role in helping the country to reach that goal. A person can’t help but wonder how things would have turned out without the unwavering support and dedication of a group of women who were looked down upon simply because they were black.

Right now we are living in a time when the slogan “Make America Great Again” has become a rallying cry for certain segments of the population.

Hidden Figures is proof that America is great only when it is inclusive. It is stymied and stagnant when it excludes certain people.

If America wants to be great it has to be united in purpose, for truly “united we stand, divided we fall.”

Let’s not fall back to the old ways of thinking. Instead, we need to break down and crash through political, social and racial barriers.

A bright light should shine upon Hidden Figures, so that all Americans can learn from our past and create a better future. Thank you Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson for dignifying and uplifting black women in particular and Americans in general.

HOLLYWOOD PLEASE LISTEN UP: The country needs more stories like this one told. Will Smith if you want to revive your career, these are the types of movies black folks want to see.

Those 1960’s Hidden Figures Hairstyles

I can’t conclude this article without mentioning all of those beautiful hairstyles worn by the actresses in the film. There was so much diversity whether women had straight or curly, relaxed or natural hair. The one thing they had in common was those hair trends. They were influenced by the music, cinema and social movements at the time.

Back in the 60s, wigs, roller set curls, and updos were staples. I loved those hairstyles! Those ladies had real style and class.

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Sherry Harris is a solopreneur at Sherry's Life. Follow me on Facebook and Twitter and, if you have thoughts on this article, join the conversation on Facebook.